Buccaneer St. Lucia Rum

80,00

Average score

Bottle Profile
Distillery Saint Lucia Distilleries
Origin Saint Lucia
Bottler none
Type Single Blended Rum (Pot + Column from the same distillery)
Alcohol By Volume 40%%
Sugar Measured
Description St. Lucia rum discontinued in 2003
Review 1

Rieviews

Review by "Lance" Score: 80

Buccaneer rum was a regular part of the St. Lucia Distillers lineup, but nowadays the rum is no longer in production - Mike Speakman said that it was in 2003.  So we can assume that the Buccaneer I tasted is at best an early 2000s rum, no later. An interesting point is that Ed Hamilton wrote of it as being 43%, but both the label photo in his book and my sample came in at 40%.  It's likely that both variations existed, depending on the market in which it sold (i.e., US versus Europe) - DDL did the same with its El Dorados, for example. [As an aside, Buccaneer is a title used by several rums over the decades: I found references to a Buccaneer Superior White, a blend of Bajan and Guyanese rum (Buccaneer Vintners, UK); another from Maryland USA (Majestic Distilling) that touted its origin as Virgin Island rum; and a Buccaneer matured rum from Ghana, made by Gihoc Distilleries in Accra, but the background of which is too lengthy to go into here.]

Nose: Honey, molasses, brine, olives, and the richness of ripe prunes, very arm and smooth.  It's a little sharp to begin with (it settles after five minutes or so), and has some interesting background aromas of gherkins, cucumbers, pears and a sort of salt-sour tang that's difficult to pin down precisely but is by no means unpleasant.

Palate: Oily, salty and sweet all at once.  Tastes a little rougher than the nose suggested it might be, but is also quite warm after one adjusts. Pineapple, cherries, mangoes, followed on by dates, molasses, honey and brown sugar, and a touch of vanilla.

Finish: Medium long, and here the molasses and burnt brown sugar notes really come into their own.  Also some light fruitiness, aromatic tobacco and vanilla, but these are buried under the molasses, really.

Thoughts: Certainly a rum from yesteryear.  Nowadays the big guns from St. Lucia Distilleries are the 1931 series, the Admiral Rodney, the Chairman's Reserve (and its offshoot the "Forgotten Casks") and some of the cask strength offerings of the Independents (including Ed Hamilton himself). The writing had been on the wall for the wide variety and range of the distillery's rums even back in the 1990s as they focused on core competencies, consolidation and better-selling brands.  It's kind of a shame, because this rum was quite a decent dram - but I like to think that all they learned in all the decades since they made them, has now been incorporated into the excellent series of standard proofed rums they make now.  In that sense, the Buccaneer still lives on.

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